Blu-Ray News #217: Madigan (1968).

Directed by Don Siegel
Starring Richard Widmark, Henry Fonda, Inger Stevens, Harry Guardino, James Whitmore, Susan Clark, Don Stroud

Madigan (1968) is yet another terrific picture from Don Siegel, from that late 60s, early 70s period when he was knocking out great movies one right after another. It came between The Killers (1964) and Coogan’s Bluff (1968), and it’s one of the best cop movies of the 60s.

Richard Widmark is Madigan, a New York cop, and he’s got 72 hours to track down a fugitive. That’s all you’re gonna get out of me. Except that it’s a great film and that Kino Lorber is bringing it to Blu-Ray later this year. I can’t wait.

31 Comments

Filed under 1968, Don Siegel, DVD/Blu-ray News, Henry Fonda, Kino Lorber

31 responses to “Blu-Ray News #217: Madigan (1968).

  1. john k

    Kino are doing fine by Don Siegel with THE BLACK WINDMILL already
    out and CHARLEY VARRICK,MADIGAN and THE GUN RUNNERS
    soon to follow.
    Sidonis,France (them of the horrid “forced subs) have just released
    Don’s fine Universal Western DUEL AT SILVER CREEK on Blu Ray.
    There’s a nice review over at DVD Classik along with over 20 screen grabs
    which look mighty fine to me.
    If Kino might consider releasing this fine Audie Murphy Western there’s
    plenty of scope for a Toby Roan commentary especially considering the
    interesting supporting cast. At least it’s good to know that a decent high-
    def master of DUEL AT SILVER CREEK now exists.
    Off topic but still with Siegel associates I saw Clint’s THE MULE last night-
    it sure did not disappoint,great soundtrack as well.
    Watching THE MULE I could not help thinking that Clint,surely has one more
    Western left in him.
    I’m also very pleased that the movie,in America has now passed the
    $100 Million mark,not bad going for an 88 year old!

    Like

  2. walter

    John K, I’m glad to see that there is a good master of THE DUEL AT SILVER CREEK(1952) out there, so there is hope of getting to view a BLU-RAY someday, hopefully. I’m a fan of Don Siegel directed movies, from way back in the day.

    I went over and browsed around DVD Classik. Reviewer Erick Maurel didn’t cut SUGARFOOT(1951) any slack. It is better than 1/10 and it doesn’t have an idiot script. I haven’t seen SUGARFOOT since I was a youngster, but my taste in Westerns hasn’t really changed that much.

    I haven’t viewed Clint Eastwood’s THE MULE(2018) yet, but I will. In the past, Clint has said that UNFORGIVEN(1992) would be his last Western. Although, I wonder if he would do a contemporary Western, if he liked the script.

    Like

  3. john k

    Hi Walter,
    Yep! the DVD Classik guys can be a tad harsh sometimes,but it’s good
    they are reviewing vintage 50’s Westerns that thus far are unreleased
    on disc. I was never too keen on the Edwin L Marin Scott films they just
    don’t have the zip or the pace of the De Toth films from the same period.
    Marin also allowed too much hokey nonsense to drift into his Scott
    pictures that De Toth or Ray Enright would never have allowed.
    There’s another German company Spirit Media that seem to have struck
    a deal direct with Universal so there’s hope they might release DUEL
    AT SILVER CREEK on Blu Ray. Spirit Media sure love their Westerns,
    their Blu Ray of MAN FROM THE ALAMO is very nice indeed.
    Screenwriter Nick Schenk was a Godsend for Clint perhaps Nick can
    come up with a Western project for him.
    Despite some lukewarm reviews THE MULE,I feel, is superb even better
    than GRAN TORINO in my view.
    I cannot wait to see it again-the shifts in tone are amazing as are
    the performances especially the actors playing the cartel guys.
    Bradley Cooper fans will not be disappointed,he’s excellent as the humane
    but no nonsense DEA agent.
    It’s funny but I only saw one film last year HOSTILES which we have
    discussed in depth before. This year,so far I’ve already seen two movies
    THE MULE and STAN & OLLIE. The latter I went into the cinema with very
    high expectations and I must say the film exceeded my expectations.
    A wonderful moment when Stan stands outside a West End cinema
    looking at a huge hoarding of ABBOTT & COSTELLO GO TO MARS…
    very very telling.

    Like

  4. john k

    In case there was any confusion regarding the above I was talking
    about films that I’ve seen in Cinemas.
    There’s already another one on my list for this year THE HIGHWAYMEN
    which has Woody Harrelson and Keven Costner tracking down
    Bonnie & Clyde,sounds great.
    I may be wrong,but it seems Clint these days is facing a “Political”
    backlash to his work similar to that which The Duke faced in the late
    ’60’s/70’s.
    Clint’s performance as a man totally out of touch with current day
    agendas is both amusing and charming. I thought that “Dykes On Bikes”
    was a concoction of Nick Schenk but Warners had to gain permission to
    use their brand name in the movie-there’s a credit at the end-shows how
    much I know!

    Like

  5. john k

    In case there was any confusion regarding the above I was talking
    about films that I’ve seen in Cinemas.
    There’s already another one on my list for this year THE HIGHWAYMEN
    which has Woody Harrelson and Keven Costner tracking down
    Bonnie & Clyde,sounds great.
    I may be wrong,but it seems Clint these days is facing a “Political”
    backlash to his work similar to that which The Duke faced in the late
    ’60’s/70’s.
    Clint’s performance as a man totally out of touch with current day
    agendas is both amusing and charming. I thought that “Dykes On Bikes”
    was a concoction of Nick Schenk but Warners had to gain permission to
    use their brand name in the movie-there’s a credit at the end-shows how
    much I know!

    Like

    • In March, we’ll be traveling to Texas to visit some old family sites and stuff — along with a number of Bonnie & Clyde spots (real and movie locations). The Highwaymen sounds interesting except for the cast — I find it very hard to watch those two in anything.

      Like

      • walter

        Toby, I understand your feelings in regard to several of the movies that Woody Harrelson(especially) and Kevin Costner have been in, over the years. I tried to watch Harrelson in a so-called Western titled THE DUEL(2016). I just couldn’t stomach that one, a waste of time.

        Kevin Costner, on the other hand, has made some good Westerns. I liked SILVERADO(1985), because it was a “‘Fun” movie. It reminded me of the Westerns of the 1930’s and ’40’s.

        DANCES WITH WOLVES(1990), I’m glad Costner went to all the trouble he did to make this Western. I don’t like everything about it, especially the “White man saves the Indians” theme. Russell Means(Chingachgook in THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS, 1992) called the movie “Lawrence of the Plains.” With that said I like to watch the movie for its beauty. Dean Semler’s photography is magnificent in its epic sweep. The really top-notch cast giving it their all and Costner is fine here, also. Costner’s directing, with a few select others, must rank alongside as one of the best directorial debuts ever. I remember, in 1989, reading about all the trouble Costner was having in filming the movie. The so-called critics were ready to pounce, and already were, by calling the movie “Kevin’s Gate.” How dare he attempt to go out to South Dakota and make a big Western after the debacle of HEAVEN’S GATE(1980). Well, well, and well. As I have said, I’m glad Kevin Costner went to all the trouble to make DANCES WITH WOLVES.

        I think that Kevin Costner’s OPEN RANGE(2003) is a well made traditional Western. I’m glad Costner made it with Robert Duvall and Annette Bening. This is such a really good entertaining movie. The acting is top-notch, especially Robert Duvall, and director Costner knows this, and he lets Duvall shine. Costner and Bening are really good riding up there along side of Duvall. What a bang up shoot-out at the end. OPEN RANGE is a gem that shouldn’t be taken lightly.

        THE HIGHWAYMEN(2019), which takes place in Texas and Louisiana during the 1930’s, isn’t a traditional Western, but it is a story that should be told. Originally it was written for Paul Newman and Robert Redford. Let’s hope the makers of the film don’t foul it up.

        Like

      • To me, Costner is a much better director than an actor. For me, he often sucks the energy out of a scene. His best performance (of the few I’ve seen) was A Perfect World, under the guidance of the great Clint Eastwood.

        Like

  6. walter

    John K, my, could be, distant cousin from the UK. Of course the Edwin L. Marin directed Randolph Scott Westerns weren’t of the quality of the Budd Boetticher, Andre De Toth, or Ray Enright ones, but I still would rather watch them than some of the balderdash that passes for entertainment today. I’m glad that the reviewers at DVD Classic are at least giving these movies a look-see.

    The tad harsh reviewers at DVD Classik gave Don Siegel’s THE DUEL AT SILVER CREEK(1952) a 6/10 and for them that is high praise. I was somewhat amused with their reviews of the new BLU-RAY’s of D. W. Griffith’s THE BIRTH OF A NATION(1915) and Richard Fleischer’s MANDINGO(1975). They gave THE BIRTH OF A NATION a 0/10 and MANDINGO a 9/10. Well, well, and well.

    Here is a good review of Clint Eastwood’s THE MULE(2018) written by a Generation Xer. https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/12/movie-review-the-mule-clint-eastwood-unforgettable-performance/ Also, have a go at this article written by the same writer, Kyle Smith. https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/clint-eastwoods-amazing-milestone/

    Concerning a backlash against Clint because of his political views. Like John Wayne before him, Clint could care less, because he realizes that his fans will still go see his movies regardless. Also, Hollywood will continue to finance his movies, because the bottom line is follow the money and Clint’s movies make a lot of money. His AMERICAN SNIPER(2014), which he only did a cameo, brought in over $350 Million at the box office(this doesn’t include all the DVD sales since). I’m so glad that Clint keeps on keeping on.

    I’ve got to go now, but I’ll be back with more on THE HIGHWAYMEN(2019), which I look forward to seeing.

    Like

    • Jerry Entract

      Thanks for those Kyle Smith review links, Walter. Very interesting comment.
      I haven’t seen anything publicizing “THE MULE” here in the UK, like John, but the same fate goes for any new Woody Allen film, another oftentimes fine film maker.
      I shall seek it out.

      Like

  7. john k

    Thanks for the link,Walter to the Kyle Smith review,very interesting.
    I don’t know what’s happened to THE MULE in the UK Warner Bros
    seem to want to bury the film-no advertising TV spots or even ads
    on the sides of busses. Even such box office bombs like HUNTER/
    KILLER had a huge bus advertising campaign here in the UK.
    I have not even seen a press ad for the film.
    Needless to say the cinema I saw it in was virtually empty.
    I see THE MULE is getting rave reviews in France and overall The French
    have far better taste than The Brits despite them giving the abysmal
    MANDINGO 9/10.
    As I mentioned before I enjoyed THE MULE enormously and what I
    really liked was how the film suddenly becomes much darker just
    past the mid way point.
    I too would rather watch an Edwin L Marin Scott Western than most of
    what’s on offer today.

    Like

  8. john k

    Thanks again Walter,that Kyle Smith stuff is fantastic,especially
    the inflation linked chart.
    Like you I’m in a hurry right now but I’ll comment further, soon.

    Like

  9. john k

    Interesting review of THE MULE by Sean Burns at The ARTery
    Sean gives the film a positive review but calls it a “sneaky examination
    of white privilege” -“There’s a lot more going under the hood here”
    Funnily enough,I get Sean’s point-especially concerning a key scene in
    the movie.
    What I don’t get is the left leaning reviewers who are only too happy
    to accuse the film of sexism and racism-without as always, not having
    got what the film is all about.
    Back to Don Siegel Jeff over at Jeff Arnold’s West has just reviewed
    DUEL AT SILVER CREEK. Jeff also gives a detailed account of Siegel’s
    Westerns. I must admit I’d love to know what parts of DEATH OF A
    GUNFIGHTER Siegel actually directed-I guess that’s something we will
    never know.
    More Audie (and that’s always a good thing) Glenn at Cinesavant has
    just reviewed Explosive Media’s lovely Blu Ray of the excellent
    POSSE FROM HELL.

    Like

  10. walter

    Toby, I agree that Kevin Costner is a much better director than an actor. I also, think his best acting was done in Clint Eastwood’s A PERFECT WORLD(1993), so no differences of opinion there.

    Costner loves Westerns and I hope that he can get his dream Western Movie project off the ground. He would like to direct a series of connected Westerns. It could be movies, or made for TV. He has co-written it with others, and I hope that he can get financing. Netflix might be the way to go.

    Like

  11. walter

    John K, cousin, you are welcome. Thanks for the mention of a Sean Burns(he is new to me) review of THE MULE(2018). It is a somewhat sly back-handed kind of review. I take it that Burns is a left leaning Generation Xer. There may be hope for him yet, in that he thinks THE MULE is efficiently entertaining. I haven’t had time to see this movie yet, but I will.

    Referring to Jeff Arnold’s review of THE DUEL AT SILVER CREEK(1952), I miss being able to comment on his blog. His blog is one that my comments go out into cyberspace. I liked the movie more than he does, although he did give it a three pistol rating.

    DEATH OF A GUNFIGHTER(1969) is a movie that I first saw on the NBC MONDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES IN 1970. I liked it and this was before I knew anything about its background history. This is another movie that its behind the scenes stories might me be more interesting than the movie. Apparently star Richard Widmark had a lot of clout on this Richard E. Lyons(FRONTIER GUN, 1958, RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY, 1962, THE ROUNDERS, 1965) production. I have a soft place for producer Lyons, because he worked to keep making traditional Westerns through the 1970’s, although he had to go to TV to accomplish it. Widmark didn’t like the way Robert Totten was directing the movie, so after 25 days of filming he was out and Don Siegel was brought in. Siegel directed for about 10 days. Siegel didn’t want his name on the movie, because he thought that Totten had directed more of the movie than he had. Widmark didn’t want Totten’s name on it. There are other stories in which both Siegel and Totten didn’t like the finished product and didn’t want their names on it. The Directors Guild of America looked at the filmed footage and concluded that both directors had about the same directed footage in the movie. I wonder if the DAG has a record of their findings somewhere. That would be a way of determining of who directed what parts of the final cut, maybe? I wonder if Blake Lucas would know how to find out about this?

    Like

  12. john k

    Dear Walter….
    do you really want a North London Working Class Oik as your cousin-
    needless to say I’m flattered beyond words. 🙂
    Thanks so much for the background info on DEATH OF A GUNFIGHTER
    I still really like the movie.
    Good to see some love for A PERFECT WORLD one of Clint’s most
    underrated films. Warners made a tactical error releasing this as their
    Christmas movie up against the monolith that was MRS DOUBTFIRE.
    Still A PERFECT WORLD grossed over $100 Million overseas.
    I too think A PERFECT WORLD was Costner’s best ever performance.
    Since his superstardom has faded Costner has made more interesting
    movies MR BROOKS is well worth a look.
    Toby’s opinion on Kevin will not be altered by anything I or more important
    Walter says; except to say Kevin did get Joel McCrea’s seal of approval.
    I used to eat in a Greek restaurant,now sadly demolished,at the back of
    London’s Centre Point. The place was neatly tucked out of the way so
    stars could dine without interference. There was a huge photo of
    Dustin Hoffman in the window who was a regular,when in London.
    The fact that yours truly could afford to dine there proved the prices were
    nothing special nor was the decor-that was the charm of the place.
    The restaurant was run by a crazy owner called Alikos who told me
    the previous night Woody Harrelson had popped in.
    Woody had been appearing in a play just down the road.
    Woody,rather inebriated, and a Vegan demanded spinach and black
    eyed peas. Alikos explained that Woody should have given him prior
    warning-as a compromise he served Woody a Greek Salad (minus
    feta cheese) and houomus.
    Alikos served the best steaks I have ever tasted,but as is my wont
    I like my sirlion steak very well done-I’ve never understood the
    current trend for “pink” meat and almost raw tuna-food hell as far as
    I’m concerned. Alikos never understood my liking for well done steak
    he used to storm off in a huff saying “you are a Philistine”

    Like

    • My grandfather was a real cowboy, and wherever he got em, he got the best steaks. They were always very well done, but he never cooked all the flavor out of them.

      One of the best steaks I ever had was cooked by me — some friends and I got together for steaks, Scotch and Mr. Majestyk. My steak-cooking skills are minimal. It was the other stuff that made that steak so good!

      Like

      • walter

        Toby, my maternal Grandfather Preston Walter Davis, son of Mattie Knight Davis and Mark Davis, was cowboying near where your great-grandparents lived. This was in 1919, and he worked on a ranch that still had some of the old Longhorn cattle. The old cowman kept them for “old times sake.” I think this was in the Mineral Wells area. Grandpa Press said that every place seemed to be named “crazy” there. Crazy Water Hotel and so forth.

        Grandpa Press always said that a meal wasn’t a meal unless there was a platter of meat on the table.

        Like

      • My great-grandmother was Lillie Knight, or Ma. My great-grandpa was simply called Pa, I’m not sure what his first name was. Will look it up. They had a tiny spread outside Breckenridge, then moved to Strawn and opened a dry cleaning place. All that’s really close to Mineral Wells.

        Like

    • Thanks to my work on Charley Varrick, I’ve been on a real Siegel kick. And along the way, I’ve read up a lot on what happened to Death Of A Gunfighter. The story seems to vary a bit from one telling (or teller) to the next, but you’ve got the gist of it.

      Like

      • walter

        If my memory serves me right, I remember reading another variation of the story, Don Siegel and Robert Totten didn’t want to take directors credit, because they said the movie was actually Richard Widmark’s.
        Some of the actors and actresses, who are still with us, would probably remember which director directed what parts of the movie. Jacqueline Scott, John Saxon, Morgan Woodward, Michael McGreevey, and Darleen Carr

        Like

    • walter

      John K, actually we might be related. My maternal Great-Grandmother’s name was Martha Victoria Knight(1863-1934). Her parents were John Knight and Mary Ann Wallace Knight. Martha “Mattie” married Mark Robertson Davis(1851-1930) in 1884. At the time they married she was a school marm(teacher). Mattie and Mark lived in a rural area called Knight’s Cove, which was down from Knight’s Mountain. They raised livestock(cattle and hogs) on a farm/ranch in Stone County, Arkansas.

      Mattie’s father John Knight was a veteran of the War of the Rebellion(1861-65). He served in the 7th Arkansas Infantry, Confederate States of America(known as the “Bloody” 7th) and in the 4th Arkansas Mounted Infantry, United States of America. Yes, John Knight served on both sides during the war. This wasn’t that unusual, because many men did, although you won’t see this very often, or not at all portrayed in the movies. Colonel Elisha Baxter of the 4th Arkansas Mounted Infantry, USA later became governor of Arkansas during Reconstruction.

      There was a small battle(skirmish) at Knight’s Cove on June 19, 1862. Confederate soldiers gathered in the hills above Knight’s Cove that lay at the bottom of Knight’s Mountain on the Knight family farm. According to The War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies(1885), a group of Union soldiers were foraging(stealing) food for both the men and the animals of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry, USA and Eighteenth Indiana Infantry, USA. They were going through Knight’s corn bin, raiding the farm of its corn and livestock, when the Union soldiers of the Fifth Missouri Cavalry, USA descended Knight’s Mountain to find them. Waiting until these two units were approaching each other, the Confederate soldiers began their attack, wounding a number of men. On the Confederate side one man was killed and others were wounded.

      The above is just a smidgen of the stories of those times of life along the Middle Border of the South and Southwest that have been passed down to me, and of private research that I have done over a lifetime.

      Like

    • walter

      John K, I’m not exactly a hoity-toity kind of guy myself. Besides, we just might be related, and Toby also.

      I’ve always thought highly of Clint Eastwood’s A PERFECT WORLD(1993). The acting chemistry between Kevin Costner and T.J. Lowther was touching. Also, I’m glad that Kevin talked Clint into portraying Red Garnett, the pursuing Texas Ranger.

      Concerning Joel McCrea’s giving Kevin Costner his seal of approval. That was really nice of Joel and I’m sure Kevin appreciated it. They were in a photo together for LIFE MAGAZINE SPRING 1989 – HOLLYWOOD 1939-1989 SINGLE ISSUE MAGAZINE. Joel said that he felt that Kevin had what it takes to carry on the tradition of the great American Western. I hope Kevin is able to direct his dream Western project.

      John Lee Hancock, a native Texan, wrote the screenplay for A PERFECT WORLD. He directed the upcoming THE HIGHWAYMEN(2019), as well as did a re-write of John Fusco’s original script. Fusco originally wrote it for Paul Newman and Robert Redford. After Newman’s death, Redford lost all interest. Also, Fusco promised Frank Hamer, Jr. that he would do his father right. Frank Hamer, Jr. hated they way his father was portrayed in BONNIE AND CLYDE(1967).

      I enjoyed your Greek restaurant and Woody Harrelson story. Also, I would rather have a steak burnt than pink.

      Like

  13. walter

    We just might be all related. From North London, England to Knight’s Cove(Pleasant Grove), Arkansas, and on to Breckenridge, Texas.

    Like

  14. john k

    The thread that wouldn’t die……..

    All this family history info is fascinating-I love the John Knight who fought
    on both sides during the Civil War story!
    Don’t know too much about my own family history I’ve never looked into
    it,except my Father grew up in Northern Ireland and my paternal
    Grandmother’s name was Rooney.
    I really must give OPEN RANGE another look,what I did not like at the
    time was Michael Gambon as the villain,a great actor given very little
    to do. James Stewart knew what guys like Dan Duryea and Arthur Kennedy
    brought to the table when they were bad guys in his Westerns.
    Clint Eastwood understood this too,he wanted someone who could really
    deliver in PALE RIDER plus the fact he owed a favour to John Russell.
    Russell told a friend of mine that he had a substantial role in
    HONKYTONK MAN which ended up on the cutting room floor.
    As Russell explained his character ended up in a “punch up” with
    Eastwood but the suits at Warners stated that we cannot have Clint
    Eastwood beating up an “old man” (Russell’s words)
    Russell’s role therefore had to go (he can be viewed scowling briefly
    at a bar-that’s all) which really pissed the actor off. Russell did however
    say that he found Eastwood a total professional on the three pictures
    that he made with him. Needless to say Gene Hackman’s textured
    role in UNFORGIVEN adds so much to the films success.

    Like

  15. john k

    Wonderful info,as always,from Walter regarding Earl Hamer.
    The great Denver Pyle wonderful,as usual, but not a flattering portrayal
    by any means.
    A little known picture inspired by the real Bonnie & Clyde which we have
    discussed before is PERSONS IN HIDING (1939)
    I would love Toby to convince Kino Lorber to release the four Paramount
    (now owned by Universal) J Edgar Hoover pictures which also include
    QUEEN OF THE MOB,UNDERCOVER DOCTOR and PAROLE FIXER.
    To have these four gems remastered in high definition would be beyond
    wonderful and I’m sure the sales would be stellar,especially regarding the
    many Noir addicts who would love these.
    Walter-you may be interested to know DVD Classik have just reviewed
    the recent French DVD of RIDING SHOTGUN.
    This Scott picture gets a much higher rating,the French critics obviously
    rate De Toth much higher than Edwin L Marin.
    I do wish Warners would give some of the De Toth/Scott pictures a
    Blu Ray upgrade.

    Like

    • walter

      John K, cousin from North London, threads don’t seem to die when you start out talking about Don Siegel, Richard Widmark, and Clint Eastwood. Often times, that leads to chasing rabbits into the brier patch.

      I’m glad you liked the story concerning John Knight following both flags. I’ve read about whole companies deserting the Confederate Army and later showing up as companies in Union regiments.

      Most people with the surname of Knight live in the USA, about 57%. Followed by about 20% in England; 8% in Australia; 4% in Canada; with the the rest in South Africa, Jamaica, and New Zealand. The first Knights, probably arrived in what is now the USA, during the 1630’s. Most can be found living in Mississippi and Alabama. In Jones County, Mississippi Newton Knight, a Confederate deserter, led a pro-Union rebellion against the Confederacy. Knight has long been a controversial figure in Mississippi History and two movies about Knight have included TAP ROOTS(1948) with Ward Bond, and FREE STATE OF JONES(2016) starring Matthew McConaughey.

      I agree that a really strong believable villain makes a movie much better. Also, I enjoyed the story given by John Russell on why most of his part in HONKYTONK MAN(1982) ended up on the cutting room floor. In my minds-eye, Russell will always be Marshal Dan Troop of the TV show LAWMAN(1958-62).

      The movies based on J. Edgar Hoover’s book PERSONS IN HIDING(1938) deserve a restored DVD. I don’t think that I have ever seen them, but I would like to.

      Thanks for the tip on the review of RIDING SHOTGUN(1954) over at DVD Classik. I, like the french critics, like Andre De Toth directed movies much better than Edwin L. Marin’s. I was somewhat surprised that reviewer Erick Maurel preferred RIDING SHOTGUN to HIGH NOON(1952).

      Like

  16. john k

    Another fascinating history lesson from Walter as always.
    This must count as a record for the number of replies to an older thread.
    Regarding French critics did not the esteemed Andre Bazin prefer
    SEVEN MEN NOW to SHANE.
    RIDING SHOTGUN is a heap more fun than HIGH NOON but I prefer
    SILVER LODE out of the three of them. SILVER LODE is way overdue
    for a proper restoration.
    Those Hoover films are great they need to be “out there”
    PERSONS IN HIDING is the best of the lot and not close behind is
    PAROLE FIXER which has wealthy “do gooders” getting duped into
    letting hardened criminals off the hook like Francis “Big Boy” Bradmore
    (Anthony Quinn)
    There’s a chilling scene which pre-dates THE BIG HEAT where Virginia
    Dale throws a pot of boiling hot coffee into Quinn’s face. Sometimes these
    1930’s women in peril did not mess around.
    The same goes for Rochelle Hudson in SHOW THEM NO MERCY!
    where she peppers Bruce Cabot with machine gun bullets very graphic
    for it’s day.
    SHOW THEM NO MERCY! is not part of the Hoover series-it’s a tough
    little Fox picture which was later re-worked as the Western RAWHIDE.
    Well cousin Walter, all things must come to an end and this thread will
    move even further down the pike as I see Kino Lorber are prepping
    Herman Cohen’s delightfully cheesy KONGA for Blu Ray…trash addicts
    have never had it so good!

    Like

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