Blu-Ray News #336: Five (1951).

Produced, written, and directed by Arch Oboler
Starring William Phipps, Susan Douglas Rubeš, James Anderson, Charles Lampkin, Earl Lee

Five people survive an atomic blast and try to figure out how to carry on. That’s pretty much the premise of Five (1951), Arch Oboler’s post-apocalyptic story shot on a number of LA locations, including Oboler’s own Frank Lloyd Wright house.

Oboler’s home has since burned to the ground, in a 2018 wildfire, so it’s great to have it has preserved in this way. It’s a stunning place.

Shot for a little over $75,000, using an unknown cast and USC students for a crew, Five is a pretty interesting picture. It’s the first of its type, and we’ve seen a lot of them sense. It’s coming to Blu-Ray from Imprint with their usual thorough batch of extras. Recommended.

5 Comments

Filed under 1951, Arch Oboler, Columbia, DVD/Blu-ray News, Imprint Films

5 responses to “Blu-Ray News #336: Five (1951).

  1. Barry Lane

    An unknown cast, perhaps, but highly accomplsihed with real resumes, especially Willliam Phis and James Anderson, but the real treasure is Susan Douglas.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Barry Lane

    Sorry about the typos: …accomplished and William Phipps, who has or had a terrific scene, uncredited with Cary Grant in Kiss Them For Me, a film that usually gets little love, but I love it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. john k

    Actually the Imprint Blu Ray is already out and I have it-not only do we get
    an obscure movie in high def but a history lesson on a complex and
    interesting character Arch Oboler; from the great commentary and Kim
    Newman’s overview of his career.
    As a “Progressive Liberal” Oboler was pretty feisty he even had a punch up
    with one of the technical crew.
    Great that Barry calls out William Phipps and James Anderson two
    actors I always enjoy-very interesting that while filming FIVE by
    day Phipps was in the evening appearing in a play with Charles Laughton,
    some of these character actors had amazing back stories.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. john k

    Watching FIVE is almost like watching a silent movie both in look and
    technique. The $75,000 budget was unusal those days but became more
    or less the norm (for exploitation type movies) when Roger Corman,
    Bert I Gordon and Richard Cunha arrived on the scene.
    Actually Kurt Neumann’s ROCKETSHIP XM was made for a mere
    $90,000 and cleaned up at the box office and had a post apocalyptic
    ending as well,thanks to Dalton Trumbo’s re-write of Neumann’s
    original draft.
    FIVE is a very powerful film and still packs a real punch and certainly
    paved the way for DAY THE WORLD ENDED and PANIC IN THE YEAR
    ZERO the latter being my firm favorite of Ray Milland’s stints as director.
    I don’t know Susan Douglas but agree with Barry that she is truly
    outstanding.
    I’ve already watched the Imprint Blu Ray three times and cannot wait
    to watch it again.
    Yes these Imprint Blu Ray’s are not cheap but since the Brexit debacle
    and weak pound I,ve got used to paying more for imports; Brexit is a
    stealth tax on movie fans as far as I’m concerned.
    I’m at the stage in life where nothing is going to stop me getting
    these outstanding releases from Imprint-you just have to shop around
    a bit,that’s all,plus the fact Australian postal charges are extremely high
    but I just cannot be without releases like FIVE and FACE BEHIND THE
    MASK.
    I enjoyed seeing the engaging Kim Newman run through Oboler’s
    career and I’m wondering how long we must wait before we see Toby
    actually “on screen” one day among the extras…Dude you cannot fight it
    it’s gotta happen one day. 🙂
    The lovely restoration,the superb commentary and Newman’s visual
    essay make FIVE a must have as far as I’m concerned wonderful
    entertainment and huge educational value,what more can you ask for.

    Like

  5. john k

    There’s a never ending flood of great Noir releases these days and
    the Cohen Media Group ( distributed by Kino Lorber) have announced
    a late April release for a 2K restored Blu Ray double feature edition
    of two of the creepiest Brit Noirs ever made.
    WANTED FOR MURDER directed by underrated Lawrence Huntington
    is an early and most impressive entry to the serial killer genre.
    Even creepier is Lewis Gilbert’s CAST A DARK SHADOW with Dirk Bogarde
    sensational as a truly loathesome individual who preys on wealthy,older
    women.
    As stand alone releases these films would be sensational,but as a double
    bill they make great value but uncomfortable viewing.

    Like

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