Category Archives: Gene Hackman

Screening: Bonnie And Clyde (1967) 50th Anniversary.

Directed by Arthur Penn
Starring Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, Estelle Parsons, Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder

Bonnie And Clyde (1967) is one of those movies my whole family loves. What does that say about us? Anyway, we’re all excited about the 50th anniversary screenings coming this August from Turner Classic Movies. My wife came across the link today, and you can already buy tickets.

So, does this mean we can count on Warner Bros. and TCM to bring Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch (1969) back in a couple years?

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Filed under 1967, Arthur Penn, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman, Gene Wilder, Sam Peckinpah, Screenings, Warren Beatty

Merry Christmas From The Hannibal 8.

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The French Connection (1971), one of my favorite films, is a long way from a Christmas movie. But here’s Gene Hackman in a Santa outfit in one of the opening scenes. “Have you ever been in Poughkeepsie?”

Merry Christmas to you all.

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Filed under 1971, Gene Hackman, Roy Scheider, William Friedkin

Making Movies: Bonnie And Clyde (1967).

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I’ve always loved Bonnie And Clyde (1967) — and always been fascinated by how it all came about.

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Here’s Arthur Penn, Gene Hackman and Warren Beatty — obviously shooting the scene where Buck Barrow gets shot.

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This one spares me the trouble of writing anything.

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This is the scene where Bonnie and Clyde meet C.W. Moss (Michael J. Pollard).

Ranchman Cafe ad

The real Bonnie and Clyde robbed the bank in Ponder, Texas. The Ranchman Cafe ran this ad after the movie people came to town. The cafe is still there — and they claim John Wayne ate there, too.

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One of the great achievements of Bonnie And Clyde, as I see it, is how well it captures the rural Texas way of life. My grandparents lived in Strawn — not far from the National Guard Armory in Ranger, robbed by Bonnie and Clyde. Aside from all the shooting, the movie feels a lot like my summer visits to towns like Strawn, Breckenridge and Albany.

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It (and The Beverly Hillbillies) also introduced me to bluegrass.

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Filed under 1967, Arthur Penn, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman, John Wayne, Making Movies, Warren Beatty

Making Movies: A Bridge Too Far (1977).

Bridge Too Far HS

I was lucky enough to attend a special screening of A Bridge Too Far (1977) here in Raleigh, North Carolina, when it first opened. I was 13. The guy James Caan played, Staff Sergeant Dohun, was there — and he was not happy that Caan dropped an F Bomb in one scene.

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Plastic commandoes ready to litter the bridge.

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Watching and waiting — something that happened in both 1944 and 1977.

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(Sir) Michael Caine (as John Ormsby Evelyn ‘JOE’ Vandeleur) and director (Sir) Richard Attenborough.

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Shooting the harrowing sequence where Robert Redford (as Major Julian Cook) and his men cross the river in flimsy assault boats. “Hail Mary, full of grace…”

I’ve always had a soft spot for A Bridge Too Far. It’s one of the last truly epic war movies, with a few jaw-dropping scenes here and there. And it was a huge moviegoing experience for me. Cornelius Ryan’s book is terrific, too.

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Filed under 1977, Gene Hackman, James Caan, Making Movies, Michael Caine, Richard Attenborough, Robert Redford, Sean Connery

Screening: Bonnie And Clyde (1967).

'Bonnie And Clyde' Film - 1967

Directed by Arthur Penn
Starring Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, Estelle Parsons, Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder

March 21, 2015
6:30 PM (Film at 8 PM)
Million Dollar Theatre, Los Angeles

Bonnie And Clyde (1967) is one of my favorite films. And this screening sounds terrific. It’s at the landmark Million Dollar Theatre, the first movie palace built by Sid Grauman. Before the show, there’ll be live jazz and ragtime by the California Feetwarmers.

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Filed under 1967, Arthur Penn, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman, Screenings, Warren Beatty

TCM Alert: That Old Sinking Feeling.

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Grab a life vest, a bowl of popcorn and a box of Raisinets. Because tonight, TCM is going down with the ships.

The Poseidon Adventure (1972) was a huge deal when I was growing up. I remember the TV spots and poster (“Hell, upside down”) hanging outside the theater in Thomasville, Georgia. I couldn’t wait to see it. It begins as a soap opera, then puts the entire cast through absolute hell. Movies don’t get much more entertaining than this one.

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A Night To Remember (1958) did more on its modest budget more than the newer Titanic picture accomplished with an endless supply of cash. (Don’t get me started on that thing.) A Night To Remember masterfully combines history, social commentary, excitement, heartbreak and suspense — even though we know how it’s gonna end — and made me the Titanic geek I am today. There are so many incredible touches in this film, courtesy of Roy Ward Baker’s assured direction. For instance, the serving cart that appears throughout to illustrate the listing of the ship — it sails across the room and crashes into the wall just as all hell breaks loose among the passengers still on board. Of course, the events of April, 1912 are a great story — and this is a great example of storytelling on film. One of the most powerful movies I’ve ever seen. (The public library here in Raleigh had a gorgeous 16mm print of A Night To Remember that I checked out several times. Heard later that all those prints were pitched into the dumpster.)

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Filed under 1958, 1972, Ernest Borgnine, Gene Hackman, Roy Ward Baker, TCM

DVR Alert: Tonight On TCM.

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Three great 70s road movies, tonight on Turner Classic Movies.

Howard Zieff’s Slither (1973, below) remains one of my favorites films. Richard B. Shull has a great couple scenes before the credits.

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Filed under 1971, 1973, Gene Hackman, Howard Zieff, James Caan, Steven Spielberg, TCM