Category Archives: 1967

Blu-Ray News #225: The Hemisphere Box Of Horrors.

You know, anybody can do a 4K scan of some perfectly-preserved studio picture made 10 years ago — or do what little is needed to put last summer’s digitally-shot blockbuster on a silver circle. But to take some cheap little independent, international piece of junk — that’s been beaten to crap wherever it’s been reposing for the last 40 years — and make it look as though it was made yesterday, well, that’s really doing something.

And that’s why I thank God for folks like Severin Films. With their upcoming The Hemisphere Box Of Horrors Blu-Ray set, they take a handful of films from Hemisphere and give them the love and respect few people would say they deserve.

The Blood Drinkers (1964, AKA The Vampire People)
Directed by Gerry De Leon
Starring Ronald Remy, Amalia Fuentes, Eddie Fernandez, Eva Montes
Some of this Filipino vampire picture was shot in black and white, some in color. The B&W scenes were tinted in various shades and promoted as “blood-dripping color. 

Curse Of The Vampires (1966, AKA Blood Of The Vampires)
Directed by Gerry De Leon
Starring Amalia Fuentes, Romeo Vasquez, Eddie Garcia
There’s a woman chained up in the dungeon of a jungle mansion. Turns out she’s a vampire who bites her son — and soon the entire family is on the prowl for blood.

Brain Of Blood (1971, AKA The Creature’s Revenge, The Oozing Skull, The Undying Brain)
Directed by Al Adamson
Starring Grant Williams, Kent Taylor, Reed Hadley, Regina Carrol, Angelo Rossitto
You can always count on Al Adamson for something terrible — and a lot of fun. It’s got everything from brain transplants to torture chambers to chained-up women to sinister dwarfs. Something for everyone. This was Reed Hadley’s last film.

The Black Cat (1966)
Directed by Harold Hoffman
Starring Robert Frost, Robyn Baker, Sadie French, Scotty McKay
This horror picture, shot in Texas, was picked up for distribution by Hemisphere. It was paired with The Blood Drinkers. This is one I’ve been wanting to see for eons.

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The Torture Chamber Of Dr. Sadism (1967, AKA The Blood Demon, The Snake Pit And The Pendulum, Castle Of The Walking Dead)
Directed by Harald Reinl
Starring Christopher Lee, Karin Dor, Lex Barker
Count Regula (Christopher Lee) is executed for killing 12 virgins in his dungeon. Years later, he comes back for revenge. This West German production, co-starring Karin Dor and Lex Barker, is a lot better movie than it’s plethora of lurid titles would indicate. (The Torture Chamber Of Dr. Sadism has to be one of the greatest movie titles of all time.) This one and The Black Cat are exclusive to this set and will not be sold separately.

All these pictures will get the usual Severin treatment with lots of extras — interviews, cut scenes, trailers and more. For those of us who can’t get enough of these things, highly recommended.

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Filed under 1964, 1966, 1967, Christopher Lee, DVD/Blu-ray News, Severin Films

Blu-ray News #223: Robbery (1967).

Robbery castRobbery-Poster

Directed by Peter Yates
Starring Stanley Baker, Joanna Pettet, James Booth, Frank Finlay, Barry Foster, William Marlowe

Producer-star Stanley Baker and director Peter Yates turned the real-life Great Train Robbery into a great British heist picture, Robbery (1967). Kino Lorber has announced its May release on Blu-Ray.

The story goes that Steve McQueen saw Robbery once it made its way to the United States, and Yates ended up directing Bullitt (1968). What Steve saw was a top-notch action film, with astonishing direction and a great script. Highly recommended. This is a very welcome release for sure.

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Filed under 1967, DVD/Blu-ray News, Peter Yates, Stanley Baker

Blu-Ray News #219: Quatermass And The Pit (1967).

Directed by Roy Ward Baker
Starring Andrew Keir, James Donald, Barbara Shelley, Julian Glover

Scream Factory’s run of terrific Hammer releases continues with maybe their best science fiction movie, Quatermass And The Pit (1967). By the time it reached the States, this third Quatermass picture was retitled Five Million Miles To Earth — since we weren’t all that familiar wth Nigel Kneale’s Quatermass stuff for the BBC. Whatever you call it, it’s really good, with great performances from Andrew Keir and the lovely Barbara Shelley.

As if that wasn’t enough, they’re also prepping Quatermass II (1957), with Brian Donlevy as the scientist. They’re coming in May. This is essential stuff, folks.

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Filed under 1967, Andrew Keir, Barbara Shelley, DVD/Blu-ray News, Hammer Films, Roy Ward Baker, Shout/Scream Factory

Blu-Ray News #216: The Vengeance Of She (1967).

Directed by Cliff Owen
Starring Olinka Berova, John Richardson, Edward Judd, Colin Blakely, Jill Melford

Scream Factory has another Hammer picture in the works, 1967’s The Vengeance Of She. It’s a sequel (almost a remake, really) to Hammer’s big-budget hit She (1965), which starred Ursula Andress. She was offered the second one, but turned it down. So did a lot of actresses before it ended up with Olinka Berova in the lead.

The lovely Carol (Berova) is mysteriously drawn to the ancient city of Kuma. There, she is to become the reincarnation of their queen Ayesha. It’s all a bit confusing, but Berova’s beautiful and the Monte Carlo locations are gorgeous.

I’m sure it’ll look splendid on Blu-Ray. And in typical Scream Factory fashion, there’s the promise of plenty of extras. I’m so happy these Hammer films are getting this kind of attention. It’s coming in late February.

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Filed under 1967, Hammer Films, Shout/Scream Factory

RIP, Michele Carey.

Michele Carey
(February 26, 1943 – November 21, 2018)

Just saw that Michele Carey has passed away. She didn’t make many movies, but when you’ve worked with John Wayne, Howard Hawks and Robert Mitchum (El Dorado, 1967) and Elvis (Live A Little, Love A Little, 1968), not to mention Frank Sinatra (Dirty Dingus Magee, 1970) — what else do you need? Oh, and then there’s How To Stuff A Wild Bikini (1965).

She’s terrific in El Dorado — everyone is. She holds her own up against some real heavyweights, in a movie that relied on Hawks’ typical rambling, improvisational tone. That’s no small task.

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Filed under 1965, 1967, 1968, 1970, AIP, Elvis Presley, Howard Hawks, John Wayne, Robert Mitchum

DVD/Blu-Ray News #198: In The Heat Of The Night (1967).

Directed by Norman Jewison
Screenplay by Sterling Silliphant
Cinematographer: Haskell Wexler
Film Editor: Hal Ashby
Music by Quincy Jones
Starring Sidney Poitier, Rod Steiger, Warren Oates, Lee Grant, William Schallert, Matt Clark, Scott Wilson

In The Heat Of The Night (1967) has stood for more than 50 years as proof you can make a movie about a subject like racism and still offer up something exciting, suspenseful and entertaining. A quick look at the pictures usually covered on this blog will show I don’t care much for Message Movies, and I firmly believe issues like racism are better handled in “regular” movies like the 1956 Westerns The Searchers or Reprisal! And in the case of In The Heat Of The Night, the “regular movie” is a murder mystery in a small Southern town.

Fact is, In The Heat Of The Night is just a cool movie, period. It’s directed, shot, edited and scored in that distinctive 60s style that makes for so many cool movies. Sidney Poitier is terrific, and Rod Steiger makes his tendency to overplay things work to his advantage. Everybody brought their A game to this one — and it toted off a stack of Oscars to prove it.

Here, the South isn’t portrayed in a positive light, but at least the accents aren’t an insult to those of us with Southern accents. Interestingly, the TV show that followed almost 20 years later is the movie’s complete opposite — it was heavy-handed in a way the movie’s not, and the fake accents will make you cringe.

This was Scott Wilson’s first movie; next came In Cold Blood (1967) and many other great things. He passed away last week, and I hope the upcoming Criterion release will remind folks of all he could do. He was so good, and so overlooked.

I can’t recommend In The Heat Of The Night enough, and I’m sure Criterion will do a terrific job with it. It’s coming in January.

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Filed under 1967, Criterion Collection, DVD/Blu-ray News, United Artists, William Schallert

RIP, Scott Wilson.

Scott Wilson
(March 29, 1942 – October 6, 2018)

Scott Wilson, a criminally underrated actor, has passed away at 76.

He made his debut in In The Heat Of The Night, followed immediately by In Cold Blood (both 1967). Lots of good stuff followed, from The Gypsy Moths (1969) to The New Centurions (1972) to The Right Stuff (1983) and beyond.

Wilson was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor for The Ninth Configuration (1980). He’s so good in that one, it’s scary. More recently, he appeared in a few seasons of The Walking Dead, which I hope sent folks looking for his earlier work. It’s certainly worth the effort.

Mr. Wilson was from my home town: Thomasville, Georgia.

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Filed under 1967, 1969, 1972